Topic: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

I sent this same question to TC support over 2 weeks ago and have received no reply.
The pedal board I have below is powered by a Gator G-Bus-8 power brick bolted underneath. It has 1700ma total. My existing pedals only use about 1000ma and I've some spare 9v jacks. A Nova Delay is being shipped to me now and I'll replace the DD-6 I have for the Nova Delay.

1) Can I run it safely and efficiently on 9v without causing any prob's.
2) How many milliamps does it use when maxed ?

thanks

http://i221.photobucket.com/albums/dd231/newysurfer/PedalBoard5-08.jpg

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

Well this is certainly a great forum.
posted this thread over a week ago - got 87 views and not a single reply.

I did get an email from Nicholas at TC Support though. Just to help out Nova Delay owners here's what he said

Response (Nicholas) 10/24/2008 07:30 AM
Dear Peter

There's no problem using Nova Delay with a 9v supply. The pedal needs a certain amount of mA (300mA t run and around 400mA when starting up) so it won't work with every 9v supply out there. But no matter what - you won't damage the pedal using a 9v supply and there's is no loss in audio quality... unless:

1. You're running a very hot signal into the pedal: This could fx be a guitar through a 20-30dB boost or distortion pedal into Nova Delay or having the pedal in the effect loop of your amp IF the effect loop is a Line level (+4dB) loop.

2. You have the pedal in a line level loop and your power amp needs a very hot signal to work properly.

The explanation is actually rather simple: When you lower the voltage you're also lowering the maximum input and output of the pedal. In other words: with a 9v supply Nova Delay won't be able to handle as hot/loud an input signal before it starts clipping. Similarly it won't be able to send out as hot an output signal as with a 12v supply.

The way to check whether you're within the gain range of the pedal with a 9v supply is pretty simple: For the input part simply listen if the pedal is making ugly digital distortion when playing at loud levels... you'll know if that happens!

The output part is a little trickier: If you have the pedal in fx a line level loop which is a very hot signal, the pedal won't be able send out the same amount of gain again on the output. The result is that you'll notice that your sound will be lower (if you're palying with distortion it may sound as if the pedal is "eating" the overdrive) compared to if you removed pedal from the signal chain entirely. That is why fx a Boss Digital Delay sound like cr*p in an effects loop... It's gain range isn't wide enough to handle such a hot signal.

To sum it up: No matter what you can't damage the pedal using a 9v supply. And if you don't notice digital distortion OR a level drop when the pedal is in the signal chain, there's absolutely no problem using it with 9v supply.

best regards

I've since been running the ND on 9v with no issues   smile

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

Hey cool, thanks for the info! I've been casually looking for a power supply for my pedals (two nova units and a couple of 9V pedals), this makes the search a bit easier as i don't have to find one that has 9V and 12V outputs.

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

Hello,

All Nova pedals need a 12V DC regulated power supply to operate properly. All of them except the new Nova Drive NDR-1 draw a current of 220-280mA. The Nova Drive draws max. 380mA and is the most ‘mA-hungry’ pedal from the Nova range.

A proper power supply for all Nova pedals should be able to deliver a current of 300mA at stabilized and regulated 12 DC. For the Nova Drive the current figure should be 400mA. By running the Nova pedals at lower voltage than the 12V DC you might be compromising the pedals dynamic range and S/N ratio (Signal to Noise). The DSP might also go into undervoltage shut down mode and your pedal stops working.

There exist a few dedicated power supplies for effect pedals on the market. The bigger and well known of these are the PP2+ from Voodoo Lab, Supacharger from BBE and the Power Plant from Mod-Tone. None of these have outlets powerful enough to supply the Nova pedals. One option though is the new ISO-5 from VL. It has one 300mA section with a 12V DC outlet. This unit will power one of the Nova pedals except the Nova Drive.

Power requirements for pedals change and realizing that, we at CIOKS made three brand new products which form our professional range of dedicated power supplies for effect pedals. The TC10 power supply is made especially for big fans of TC Nova pedals and is able to power four of these properly including the Nova Drive along with other standard 9V pedals. The DC10 can supply three Nova pedals and the AC10 two. Please have a closer look at the specifications of these units on CIOKS web site.

If you have other questions regarding powering effect pedals which are not related to TC products, you’re more than welcome to e-mail me directly. I have more than 18 years experience in this field.

Best regards,
Poul Ciok

Follow CIOKS on Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/cioks

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

I've been using my Nova Drive with its own power supply but the rest of my board is powered from a Diago 3000ma supply (so plenty of spare milliamps!). I used to use an 18v Dunlop pedal and bought one of Diago's special leads which uses a digital circuit to increase the normal 9v output to 18v. I'm wondering if this set up might power the Nova Drive? there's obviously plenty of spare current but would the higher voltage do any damage?

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

"uses a digital circuit to increase the normal 9v output to 18v". Be careful, the Nova Drive is a real power pig... make sure it can supply 400ma. That's 10 to 20 times what a typical distortion pedal draws. And yes, 18V might damage it, that's a long way from 12V... only way to find out for sure is try it. Any volunteers? I didn't think so ;-) You could take an 18V source and regulated it down to 12 with a very simple circuit.

Last edited by Mel (2010-12-29 19:40:31)

Axe: Gibson LP Florentine, LP Artisan, Terry McInturff Zodiac
FX: TC G-System, TC NovaDrive
Amp: Rivera S-120

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

Pretty much my thinking.

There's plenty of current available as the board only houses my Nova System, a wah, a MIDI controller and a tuner as well as the Nova Drive but it's the voltage I'm concerned about. I might try using the 9v supply without the special cable, and see how that works. I don't think that can do any harm but it may not sound very good and/or have poor S/N ratio.

I think I was hoping someone with better knowledge of electronics than me would post a reply saying "the Nova Drive can tolerate loads of excess voltage and provided the current capacity is at least 380ma, it will be fine" ;-)

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

You can easily and safely power a 12V pedal from 18V using a simple regulator circuit. Parts are very inexpensive.
Info here: http://diyaudioprojects.com/Technical/V … Regulator/
and here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_regulator

However, unless you are driving the c**p out of it (active pickups for example) it will probably be fine with 9V.

Axe: Gibson LP Florentine, LP Artisan, Terry McInturff Zodiac
FX: TC G-System, TC NovaDrive
Amp: Rivera S-120

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

Thanks Mel. I'll give it a try and see. I use passive pickups on all my guitars - I don't really like the tone of most active pups.

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

So I tried using 9V OneSpot adapter for my nova delay and nova drive.

It was working for the first minute or so, and I was switching back and forth between the original 12V adapter and the onespot adapter to check for any noticeable sound quality.

All of the sudden it gives me a farting kind of sound and the novadrive drops dead (the digital stuff are still working, when u switch the pedal on, there's no sound).

Smelled a bit of burnt stuff so must have burnt out a circuit or something.

I didn't think under voltage would damage the pedal.

Any plausible explanations anyone can think of?
maybe Switching between 9v and 12v shortly backandforth affected the circuit?

So beware, 9V MAY damage your pedal. Have to spend $130 to get it repaired from the service centre now.

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

This is a good posting,I was wondering if I could use this write-up on my website, I will link it back to your website though. If this is a problem please let me know and I will take it down right away

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

This is their reply:
"Hello,
Thank you for contacting TC Electronic.
It's doubtful the 9v voltage did this - but it could have been the switching back and forth, or the One Spot if you had both pedals running at 9v. The One Spot connects all the grounds together when powering multiple pedals - this combined with the underpowering and switching could have caused this.
It's better(and recommended) to use the original power adaptors with the Nova pedals - these can be ordered through our dealers (Part #500040011) - barring that, to power multiple Nova pedals we recommend the following 'Brick' style power supplies as they keep the grounds separated for the individual pedals "

So now I'm wondering what is the issue when powering multiple nova pedals with a 9V batter with regards to grounding? Not so good at electrical stuff, can some one translate the reply in to easier English?

Re: Nova Delay - is it safe and efficient to power it on 9v

Newysurfer wrote:

1. You're running a very hot signal into the pedal: This could fx be a guitar through a 20-30dB boost or distortion pedal into Nova Delay or having the pedal in the effect loop of your amp IF the effect loop is a Line level (+4dB) loop.

Hi,

I wonder if  I would run fender strat ->mxr dynacomp ->Mxr GT-OD   ->EHX Big muff bass -> MXR micro amp before the nova repeater into fender hot rod deluxe straight input (no fx loop)
how much dB boost this will be? and will 9V suply soundwise will be ok.
cause I want to buy NOVA REPEATER, but I do not want another 12V power wallwart. I want to run my current 9V supply that has 2000mA.